Gallery update Freddie Mercury at Queen’s post party at the Aladdin Casino

Gallery update Freddie Mercury at Queen’s post party at the Aladdin Casino

Freddie Mercury at Queen’s post party at the Aladdin Casino in Las Vegas December 15, 1977

“Only a select group of trusted photographers were permitted to photograph Queen’s performances and their photo sessions as they very controlled. I was invited to an exclusive post-concert party at Aladdin Hotel in Las Vegas back in 1977. I was there with my pal Rodney Bingenheimer and we were welcomed with open arms. I had this wonderful dinner, we sat by Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor. I knew Freddie was really camera shy so I only took a few pics, he hated to have these taken. Freddie was not one to mug for the camera. He was cool about it though. I was really shy too and I didn’t want to bother him. We were treated like kings. Concerts sometimes were a bore to shoot, but not with Freddie Mercury at a Queen gig. We will always miss you Freddie!”

Brad Elterman

Photographer

Brad Elterman snapped the pictures

QUEEN’S POST PARTY AT THE ALADDIN CASINO

The line ‘Mama, just killed a man’ on the song ‘Bohemian Rhapsody

The line ‘Mama, just killed a man’ on the song ‘Bohemian Rhapsody

The line ‘Mama, just killed a man’ on the song ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ was Freddie’s covert way of saying that he had now left his old, straight life behind him.

I got a feeling that Freddie always had a complex that he wasn’t as well-educated as the others. Maybe that’s why he chose to leave them and go back to his dressing room or hotel room. He seemed to prefer hanging out with his own entourage or ‘harem’, as it became known.

Or was it just his dark secret, the suspicion that he was HIV positive, that got in the way?

Sometimes Brian and I would knock on Freddie’s door to show him one of my pictures. (Brian always wanted to see the latest ones, so in the morning I would run around town in a new city looking for photo processing labs). But Freddie was only moderately interested. He might have said ‘nice shot’; that was about it.

He wasn’t a diva though, far from it. Instead I remember him as being an extremely polite, humble and friendly chap.

Be that as it may, Freddie was never around when the other guys hit the bars after a gig. Nor was Roger, the always polite, real British gentleman, who also preferred to set up his own after-parties.

For this reason, it would often be a small trio, Brian, John and myself, who would go out for a pint or two, rarely more. None of them seemed interested in getting particularly drunk. When Queen was interviewed by a Japanese newspaper in 1975, John had replied that his favourite drink was ‘milk’ and Brian had said ‘grapefruit juice’. Clearly, it was music that had attracted them to the business from the start, not dreams of some kind of rock star life.

The thing is, even if we rarely talked about it that summer of 1986, Freddie had become an important part of my life. He was one of the few stars who always owned the stage, who almost seemed to own the world. Every inch of him an artist.

I have thousands of pictures of Freddie stashed away, not all of them good, of course, but still I find it hard to identify a single one where he doesn’t come off looking totally luminous.

Even when he is lying seemingly wasted, almost dead, on a staircase on stage, his pose is perfect.

The Queen is dead. Long love the Queen.”

[Torleif Svensson, ‘Queen – The Last Tour’]

📷 Torleif Svensson, 1986

Gallery update Spain Sheer Attack tour

Gallery update Spain Sheer Attack tour

13 December 1974, Queen performed @ Palacio de los Deportes de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain 🇪🇸

“Sheer Heart Attack” Tour

This is the last show of the European tour, bringing an end to a successful year for the band.

In a 1979 interview, Brian May said he had good memories of this show, their first in Spain.

“Well, on stage I just click. To be honest, performing comes quite easily realty. It doesn’t take me that much. I mean, I know it sounds conceited and there are a lot of setbacks and a lot of strains and nerves, but not nearly as much as there used to be. Now we are a headline band we know people have come to see us. Being support is one of the most traumatic experiences of my life.”

Freddie Mercury

Melody Maker Extract – December 1974

The pictures are from the December 27 issue of a Spanish magazine called “Disco Expres.”

SPAIN 🇪🇸 “SHEER HEART ATTACK” TOUR

Freddie Mercury backstage

Freddie Mercury backstage

Freddie Mercury backstage

A fan recalls there wasn’t much atmosphere to begin with because the show began and ended in daylight, due to a lack of lighting on the Slane site. Plenty of people in the audience got drunk and, combined with the steady rainfall, it led to some problems all afternoon. It began with various objects being thrown at the opening acts. Suzanna Hoffs of The Bangles said at one point, “We’re sorry you’re getting wet. We are too, but at least you can’t get electrocuted!”

Sam Coates was in the audience and recalls, “One thing I clearly remember was a guy getting on stage and running at Freddie. Freddie very cool; he put his arm around him and walked him down the steps and led him to the security staff who escorted him off-stage.” Around this point he tapped a security guy on the shoulder and told him, “This is your job.”

(read more on queenlive.ca website)

then came Queen and the world

then came Queen and the world

“First there came rock groups. And lo, they were good. And then came Queen and the world trembled. For Queen are not just a group, they are a way of life, an institution, and they have a place in the national heritage of treasures,” said journalist, Chris Welch.

The British music press treated Queen’s music roughly most of the time. Instead of appreciating their national treasure and try to make the best out of it, they reviewed their albums without even listening to them, always in a deprecating way.

Freddie just burnt their reviews the moment he received them. After all the harm and gratuitous insults these people had inflicted in the past, it was too late to redress the balance now.

“If the clipping was from a British publication, it went straight onto the fire, the American and European clippings, he kept.

Of course, serious journalists, like Maura Sutton, singled out Freddie for particular praise, and also hit out at the British music press for its continuous persecution of him: ‘Freddie Mercury has always attracted the greatest amount of flak from critics too busy to acknowledge the fact that he’s one of the greatest rock vocalists ever!’ This review excited Freddie the most,” said Peter Freestone. 💛

Gallery update videoclip “Innuendo”

Gallery update videoclip “Innuendo”

13 December 1990 – Hibbert Ralph Animation Ltd produced a version of “Innuendo” music video.

After the phenomenal success of The Miracle, and indeed the 1980s in general, Queen were soon recording the follow-up. What emerged in February 1991 was to become the last completed Queen studio album in Freddie’s lifetime – ‘Innuendo.’ The first single lifted from this stunning return to form was the epic title track, a song which was six and a half minutes in length but had hit written all over it.

Unusually for Queen, the video had minimum input from the band – much of the ideas coming from director’s Jerry Hibbert and Rudi Dolezal. The piece required no actual work on the part of the band, relying instead of award winning animation. There were two main sections to the video – the first was a doll’s house style theatre complete with grotesque yet imaginative characters was made from clay models and was brought to life via stop motion animation. The second part was the more difficult to create, as each member of the band became a living characature in the style of famous artists. To this end, live action stock footage was used as a template, in effect placing an oddly realistic yet heavilly stylised version of Queen directly in the centre of the action.

The two styles of animation, including a masterful stop motion vaudeville inspired jester dance sequence during the flamenco guitar solo, were combined with archive footage of war and celebration, in much the same vein as the earlier Under Pressure video, plus animated recreations of Granville’s drawings which had inspired the album and single sleeve design for the era. The result was breathtaking – a true masterpiece once again from a band that seemingly knew no limitations.

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