Freddie Mercury Online

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A lot of people are creative, in their own way. It doesn’t have to be just in music.

21/02/2021   freddiemercuryonline   4

A lot of people are creative, in their own way. It doesn’t have to be just in music. That is part of talent as well. I’ve always maintained that; that you can’t just sit at home and say, “Look, I’m so, wonderful, I’m so creative, I’ll just wait.” No! You’ve got to go out there and actually grab it, and utilise it, and make it work. That is part of the talent. Having talent is one thing, but to actually use it and feed it to the masses, is another part of it. It goes hand in hand. It’s called Hard Sell. You’ve really got to sell your arse. You’ve got to go in there and ram it down their throats and say, “Here I am! I’m creative! I’m wonderful! Here…EAT IT”. You have to do that. If there are other ways of doing it, then my God, you tell me.

Freddie Mercury

“I don’t think of myself as a legend. Me and legends don’t get on.

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“I don’t think of myself as a legend. Me and legends don’t get on. I’m just a little sweetheart… I’m a sweetie. To me, a legend is someone like Montserrat Caballé. She’s the legend… I don’t want to draw parallels to anybody else, because I don’t think I have a parallel.”

Freddie Mercury

For the first time since he had told me of his condition Freddie brought up the subject of his death.

19/02/2021   freddiemercuryonline   0

For the first time since he had told me of his condition Freddie brought up the subject of his death. He asked me a very odd question, ‘What are you going to do when I die?’

‘I don’t know,’ I said, crying, ‘I can’t handle it all.’

‘Well how do you think I feel?’ he replied. I looked over and Freddie was crying too. He cuddled up to me and we cried quietly together, hugging each other tighter for some kind of reassurance…..

I lay awake crying most of the night, with the thought of Freddie’s illness and his inevitable death racing through my mind. What was I going to do when he died? I had no idea. I often used to cry on my own, thinking about Freddie’s illness during quiet moments at Garden Lodge, but I made sure he never saw me doing it. I’d go to bed and cry myself to sleep. Through the day I tried to put all thought of Freddie’s illness at the back of my mind, but in the still of the night it would come back to haunt me.

Jim Hutton

Hoop diddy diddy hoop diddy do”

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November 23, 1990 – Queen began filming ‘Headlong’ promo video which was directed by DoRo (Torpedo Twins) at Metropolis Studios over the course of two days.

By this point, the band and those close to them knew that Freddie was on borrowed time, and that they would never again perform live as a four-piece. However, it was felt important to maintain the perception that they could still tour when they were ready to do so, and the performance footage filmed in Metropolis Recording Studios in London (where the band recorded much of Innuendo) is startlingly energetic considering the seriousness of Freddie’s condition. He may have looked slightly frailer than in previous years, but he was still darting around as he had always done.

The second day of filming was spent in the control room and relaxation suite in the studio, as the band played around for the camera. Again, Freddie seemed surprisingly energetic, and was certainly enjoying the experience, perhaps knowing all too well that it would never happen again, as his final two video shoots were intensely grueling for him physically.

Brian May said in an interview in 2011, “There was a lot of joy, strangely enough, Freddie was in pain . . . but inside the studio there was a sort of blanket around, and he could be happy and enjoy what he liked doing best. . . . Sometimes it would only last a couple of hours a day because he would get very tired. But during that couple of hours, boy, would he give a lot.

Producer Dave Richards said, “He was dying when he did those songs, and he knew he would be dead when they were finished because he said to me, ‘I’m going to sing it now because I can’t wait for them to do music on this. Give me a drum machine and they’ll finish it off.’”

Here’s the video clip
https://youtu.be/zhyaAPsT1LU

Queen completed their three day filming of ‘Radio GaGa’ promo video

17/02/2021   freddiemercuryonline   0

November 24, 1983 – Queen completed their three day filming of ‘Radio GaGa’ promo video @ Shepperton Studios in London. It was directed by David Mallet.

The video for the track has since become a firm favourite among both casual and diehard fans alike, and was one of the most expensive Queen ever made. At a cost of more than £110,000, the epic piece was shot by David Mallet and paid homage to Fritz Lang’s 1926 expressionist masterpiece Metropolis.

At the time, famed disco producer Georgio Moroder was reworking what footage still survived of the heavily damaged film (its distributors had edited the film and much of the excised footage was lost until a chance rediscovery of sections of it less than a decade prior), and adding colour filters and a contemporary score – which Freddie had agreed to contribute to.

Freddie’s song, Love Kills, cowritten with Moroder and featuring an uncredited Brian May and Roger Taylor, became a hit single later in 1984, and featured in a key scene of the reworked film. The Radio Ga Ga promo included different scenes from Metropolis, and the rights to these were bought by the band and Jim Beach directly from the German government.

Much of the rest of the video used sets loosely based on those in the film: the machine the film’s hero Freder operates, for example, was recreated in vibrant colours for Freddie to work. Another set piece also required five hundred extras to become the faceless workers who stand before the band, their heads bowed, clapping their hands in a manner now familiar to every hardened Queen fan (particularly those who would later perform the same move whenever the band perform the song on tour). For this, David Mallet turned to members of the fan club, who once again found the required number of more than willing fans at incredibly short notice, spending all of 23rd November 1983 under very hot lights at Shepperton Studios in London with only a short break for lunch. Yet as ever, the fans were on top form, and outshone the band, who kept forgetting their timing!

Roger Taylor penned this fantastic song as a commentary on television overtaking radio’s popularity and how one would listen to radio in the past for a favourite comedy, drama, or science fiction programme. It also addressed the advent of the music video and MTV, which was then competing with radio as an important medium for promoting records.

At the 1984 MTV Video Music Awards the video for “Radio Ga Ga” would receive a Best Art Direction nomination. Roger Taylor was quoted:

“That’s part of what the song’s about, really. The fact that they [music videos] seem to be taking over almost from the aural side, the visual side seems to be almost more important.”

Originally, this was “Radio Ca-Ca,” which was something Roger Taylor’s son Felix exclaimed one day in trying to say the radio was bad (“radio, CACA!). The phrase stuck with Taylor and inspired the anti-commercial radio themes in the lyrics. Of course the band asked for a rewrite from Ca-Ca to Ga Ga.

He sang every form in the business—rock, pop, blues, country, soul, disco, opera—

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He sang every form in the business—rock, pop, blues, country, soul, disco, opera—without disgracing any of them. Music loves to dance in the voice of a great singer and Freddie had a superlative voice. It was as if he didn’t really “hit” notes: he would more or less sweep them. As rock ‘n’ roll landmarks go, the Mercury voice had the range of the Matterhorn and the complexity of the Eiffel Tower.

Brian May